Deuterium – The Hoax That Will Not Die – Part Two

So, what actually is Deuterium? It is a type of hydrogen, also known as Hydrogen-2, with the symbol D or 2H instead of H and is known as an isotope. An atom of ordinary hydrogen, the most basic and lightest of all the elements, consists of a nucleus of one proton but Deuterium’s nucleus has an extra lump called a neutron. Combined with Oxygen it makes heavy water D2O2, aka Deuterium Oxide, which is about 10 per cent heavier than ordinary water, H20.

Deuterium is extracted from seawater using a process called the Girdler sulfide process, invented in 1943, which you can read about here.

It is non-toxic, odourless and flammable but, as with hydrogen, it will asphyxiate you if you are in an atmosphere containing too much of it, which is not going to happen in the real world, at least on Earth.

Heavy Water is everywhere, from inside your body and the water that comes out of your taps, about 1 in 3000 molecules of what you drink, to the oceans. The biggest concentration is one the surface of the sea, where sunlight evaporates lighter H20.

Heavy water is most often associated with nuclear power. Put simply it is used to soak up radiation to prevent the reactor melting down. That process turns Deuterium into Tritium, another hydrogen isotope with rather different characteristics – it is very poisonous and radioactive.

So, heavy water is used to control (moderate) nuclear reactions but does not generate energy itself.

Because Deuterium is stable, it does not spontaneously generate hydrogen for energy generation.

Now let us compare the Bongbong Marcos claims with scientific facts.

Part Three

Part One
Part Three
Part Four
Part Five

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