Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part 6

Much of the Tallano claim to the whole of the archipelago depends upon a document called OCT 01-4 allegedly signed by Dawsonne Drake in 1764, witnessed by George III, issued under the authority of the (Spanish) Royal Audencia in Manila. If this document is fraudulent then all documents of the 18th and 19th century that cite it in support of the claim must also be fraudulent.

Continue reading “Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part 6”

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Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part 5

So far, we have determined that two key claims of the Tallano story have no basis in the historical record. There is no record of a Hacienda Filipina nor of a king who ruled the whole of Luzon.

This is not looking good.

Now let’s deal with another common thread in the Tallano story, one which firmly connects it with Ferdinand Marcos, the Marcos wealth, and the Astonishing claims that the Tallanos loaned a massive quantity of gold to the Vatican which it gave to Hitler to prosecute World War II, a deal allegedly negotiated by Ferdinand Marcos as a young lawyer in the mid-1930s.

Maharlika, depending on which version you read was a tribe in Luzon, the original name of the Philippines or a class of noble royalty. None of these interpretations are known to history nor mentioned in any contemporary documents, whether pre-hispanic Chinese rutters or Spanish records, nor the records of friars who tried to collect every bit of data they could find about the Philippines.

Continue reading “Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part 5”

Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part 4

Many, if not most people, think that the Spanish language first appeared in the Philippines with the arrival of Magellan on the Island of Cebu in the early 16th century. In fact the first known Spanish speaker in the islands was a slave called Pazeculan. Since the Filipinos of the time were keen on slave raiding and trading and there was a Spanish presence in South East Asia, including Spanish Muslims escaping from the Peninsula after the fall of Muslim rule with Reconquista just a few decades before Magellan’s arrival in the Philippines and the banning of Islam in Spain.

Of more relevance to our swim through history is the man he belonged to: Prince Aceh of Tondo, the man the Spanish thought ruled the whole of Luzon, until they got to Manila, long after the remains of the Magellan expedition seized Aceh’s boat off Brunei and held him to ransom.

Continue reading “Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part 4”

Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part 3

 

Back in 2009 the Philippine Court of Appeals invalidated a number of documents produce be those connected with the Tallano claim. You can read that decision by clicking on this photo. Among those documents was OC=01-4 and its derivatives. All were declared fraudulent.

But is that good enough?

Can I trust lawyers to establish the authenticity of a document in the absence of a forensic document examiner’s report and an analysis by a historian. I have a reason for not doing so: Until the mid-1990s or so, one outright fraud, the Code of Kalatiaw, produced by a known fraudster called Jose E Marco, and a document misrepresented as the early evidence of pre-hispanic treaties were required studies in Philippine law schools.

Continue reading “Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part 3”

Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part 2

As we were conducting investigations and interrogation into OCT/Pritical 01-4 dated 1764 we discovered that if you step inside a genuine real estate agency in the Philippines and look around you’ll see a wall poster something like the one here. It is issued by the Housing and Urban Development Co-Ordinating Council, HUDCC, warning of dodgy dealers running squatting syndicates.

Squatting syndicates make money by drawing up fake documents then use them to sell land they don’t own to poorer people. It is a money-making scam that victimises both the real land-owner and the unwary purchaser.

Often the supposed original documents were written before World War 2 and air now claimed to be missing or so damaged as to be unreadable and therefore not available for validation by a document examiner or be presented in court.

Some of the names and docu,emts ciyed in this poster are familiar to those who follow the Tallano gold story.

Indeed, OCT 01-4 is the very first document on the list, just below it is the name of Prince Julian Tallano Group and other connected names.

Here is a closer view of the relevant part of the poster: Continue reading “Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part 2”

Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part One

I have long been fascinated by the claim that the Philippines is entirely owned by a royal family that lays claim to many millions of tonnes of gold. Who wouldn’t be? Especially since there is no historical record of a Kingdom of Maharlika and a Hacienda Filipina nor a Christian King Lusong who ruled the entire island of Luzon.

There are references all over social media, Youtube and elsewhere to this fantastic haul of riches and royalty. It would be too easy to dismiss the tale as a fantasy, constructed by a fantasist, supported by a semi-religious cult apparently to show that the late Ferdinand Marcos of the Philippines secured his family’s massive wealth by some other means than by being paid backhanders by the likes of Westinghouse – which dropped him $18m for saddling his country with the expesnse of building an obsolete nuclear powerstation in an earthquake zone – and his plundering of the national treasury and the gold reserves of the Central Bank of the Philippines,  to the tune of $10bn.

Continue reading “Interrogating Tallano – Is the Philippines the richest country in the world? Part One”

Philippine Genocide? The Numbers Don’t Add Up

Philippine Genocide? The Numbers Don’t Add Up

(The following is based on several discussion on the Facebook Philippine American War groupi, we are grateful for the immense wealth of expertise and enthusiasm in researching this issue.)

We cannot know for sure how many died during the conflict of 1899-1902. Estimates of actual combatants range from 25,000 to 36,000 but the main controversy relates to how many civilians died during the conflict, estimates range from 200,000 to 3 million and whether those were deliberate or unintentional.

No estimate has been made in the available literature of civilian casualties during the 1896-1898 revolution nor of civilians killed by Filipino Republican forces during the Philippine-American Warii.

Census figures are immensely problematic especially when comparing the census carried out under the Spanish regime for pre-1899 figures and those under the American regime for the post-1899 period due to different methodologies. Some of the issues are covered in a briefing for the Senate Committee on the Philippine of 1902 (See Appendix). Continue reading “Philippine Genocide? The Numbers Don’t Add Up”